RDS Training & Workshops


 

Social Networks and Health 2017

May 22-26, 2017

Overview

The 2017 Social Networks and Health workshop is a week-long workshop that will introduce attendees to topics in social networks, and how they can be applied to research on health. The workshop will cover the following topics:

  • Network data collection
  • Network measures and description
  • Visualization of networks
  • Ego-network analysis
  • Regression with networks (including randomization techniques)
  • Diffusion and peer influence
  • Exponential random graph models (ERGM)
  • Stochastic Actor-Oriented Models (SAOM, or Siena models)

and will include guest lectures on:

  • IRB considerations for network data collection
  • Challenges with respondent-driven sampling (RDS)
  • Causal Inference and design of social network-based interventions

Each lesson will be illustrated with a lab section showing how to analyze network data in R.  The target audience is health researchers familiar with regression analysis who would like to learn how to incorporate network analysis into their research.

The workshop will take place at Duke University from May 22 to May 26, 2017.

 

Registration

To Register for the 2017 Social Networks and Health workshop click on the button below

Click to Register

Registration is limited to 66 participants, and will close on May 10, 2017 at 5:00pm EDT.

Registration costs $150, and includes breakfast, lunch, dinner, and parking at Duke for participants for the entire week. Out of town registrants are encouraged to  make reservations at the JB Duke Inn.  Workshop guests will be able to book in a block of rooms at the JB Duke Inn until May 1st, 2017.

For questions about the workshop or the registration please email us

Biostatistics Seminar: “Inference and Diagnostics for Respondent-Driven Sampling Data”

Event

15 Mar 2016 15:30 to 16:30
Purvis Hall : Room 24, 1020 avenue des Pins Ouest Montreal Quebec Canada , H3A 1A2

Krista J. Gile, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts

Inference and Diagnostics for Respondent-Driven Sampling Data

ALL ARE WELCOME

Abstract:

Respondent-Driven Sampling is type of link-tracing network sampling used to study hard-to-reach populations.  Beginning with a convenience sample, each person sampled is given 2-3 uniquely identified coupons to distribute to other members of the target population, making them eligible for enrollment in the study. This is effective at collecting large diverse samples from many populations.

Unfortunately, sampling is affected by many features of the network and sampling process, which complicate inference.  In this talk, I highlight key methodological challenges arising from data collected in this manner.  I then introduce key methods for diagnostics and inference in these settings, and describe new methods under development.

Bio:

Krista J. Gile’s research focuses on developing statistical methodology for social and behavioral science research, particularly related to making inference from partially-observed social network structures. Most of her current work is focused on understanding the strengths and limitations of data sampled with link-tracing designs such as snowball sampling, contact tracing, and respondent-driven sampling.

http://people.math.umass.edu/~gile/

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An Introduction to Respondent-Driven Sampling

Institution: Medical Research Council South Africa

Venue: Cape Town, South Africa

Date: 25/05/2015 – 29/05/2015

Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a type of sampling increasingly used to sample from ‘hidden’ populations, such as men who have sex with men (MSM),injection drug users, the homeless, and immigrants. RDS involves peers recruiting their peers, which can result in rapid study recruitment, but also presents a number of logistical and statistical challenges. This event will provide an introduction to the basic theory of RDS, how best to conduct RDS studies in the field, and current methods for analysing data from RDS studies.

Organiser

Dr Loraine Townsend
Bryan Hansen

Level

Entry (no or almost no prior knowledge)

Cost

The fee is:

1. ZAR 1000 – For South African registered postgraduate students

2. ZAR 1900 – For staff at South African academic institutions, funded researchers and registered charity organisations

3. ZAR 5000 – For all other participants

All fees include event materials, lunch, morning and afternoon tea. They do not include travel and accommodation costs.

Website and registration

Contact Bryan Hansen
Training Administrator
BRYANT Research Systems
Cape Town, South Africa
Tel: +27 83 248 2476

More information and to register email: info@bryantresearchsystems.com

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ECPR Summer School in Methods and Techniques 2014

The ECPR has an annual summer school program and this year they will have a course on RDS methods and analysis.

24 July – 9 August 2014, University of Ljubljana

For more information please see: http://ecpr.eu/Events/EventDetails.aspx?EventID=92

posted:12/04/2014 BRYANT Research Systems

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Respondent-Driven Sampling

Institution:Postgraduate Allied Health Institute

Date(s): 17 Apr 2013 – 19 Apr 2013

Course Times: 9.00 am – 5.00 pm

Duration: 3 Days

Fees:
A. Qualitative Research Methods (2 days) $ 920.20
B. Respondent Driven Sampling (3 days) $1380.30
C. (A+B)Full 5- Day Course 15-19 April $2140.00
D. (A+B) + Assessment for credit $2247.00

Registration Closing Date: 01 Mar 2013, Friday

Venue:
Postgraduate Allied Health Institute
168 Jalan Bukit Merah, Connection One
Tower 3, #06-08
Singapore 150168

Program/Specialities: courses / Research
RDS is used worldwide to gather representative samples of hidden and hard-to-reach populations at high risk for HIV, including injecting drug users, female sex workers, men who have sex with men and youth at risk. RDS is an adaptive chain-referral sampling technique that uses statistical adjustments for social network sizes and recruitment effort to produce generalisable findings. It is generally understood that RDS can only be applied in populations that are socially networked and members of the networks are willing to recruit from among their peers. RDS is neither simple to implement nor without controversy, and this course will provide participants with an up-to-date view of these methodological issues and analytical concerns from the point of view of a world-leading practitioner of this method in the health field. Students will work in a group to develop a RDS study on a selected population in a selected country to present on the final day.

For Enquries
• tan.siew.hong@sgh.com.sg
• (65)6576 2707
• (65)6270 7047

For more information

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An Introduction to Respondent-Driven Sampling

Institution: BRYANT Research Systems

Date: 18/02/2013

Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a type of sampling increasingly used to sample from ‘hidden’ populations, such as men who have sex with men (MSM),injection drug users, the homeless, and immigrants. RDS involves peers recruiting their peers, which can result in rapid study recruitment, but also presents a number of logistical and statistical challenges. This event will provide an introduction to the basic theory of RDS, how best to conduct RDS studies in the field, and current methods for analysing data from RDS studies.

Organiser

Loraine Townsend
Bryan Hansen

Level

Entry (no or almost no prior knowledge)

Cost

The fee is:

1. ZAR 450 – For South African registered postgraduate students

2. ZAR 900 – For staff at South African academic institutions, funded researchers and registered charity organisations

3. ZAR 3000 – For all other participants

All fees include event materials, lunch, morning and afternoon tea. They do not include travel and accommodation costs.

Website and registration

Contact Bryan Hansen
Training Administrator
BRYANT Research Systems
Cape Town, South Africa
Tel: +27 83 248 2476

More information and to register email bryan@bryantresearchsystems.com

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An Introduction to Respondent-Driven Sampling

Institution: NCRM, University of Southampton

Date: 20/04/2012

Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a type of sampling increasingly used to sample from ‘hidden’ populations, such as injection drug users, the homeless, and immigrants. RDS involves peers recruiting their peers, which can result in rapid study recruitment, but also presents a number of logistical and statistical challenges. This event will provide an introduction to the basic theory of RDS, how best to conduct RDS studies in the field, and current methods for analysing data from RDS studies.

Organiser/Chair

Renee Luthra, University of Essex
Simon Frost, University of Cambridge

Level

Entry (no or almost no prior knowledge)

Cost

The fee is: 1. £30 – For UK registered postgraduate students 2. £60 – For staff at UK academic institutions, ESRC funded researchers and registered charity organisations 3. £220 – For all other participants 4. All fees include event materials, lunch, morning and afternoon tea. They do not include travel and accommodation costs.

Website and registration

More information and to register

Contact Jacqui Thorp
Training Administrator
National Centre for Research Methods
University of Southampton
Tel: 023 8059 4069
Email: jmh6@soton.ac.uk

Address

Pitt Building, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge

Region

East of England

Keywords
Sampling, Respondent-Driven Sampling

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HIV surveillance and evaluation of HIV prevention in high-risk groups

Date: 14.11.2011. – 18.11.2011.

Venue: Zagreb, Croatia

Objectives

The aim of this workshop is to provide participants with theoretical knowledge and practical skills in implementation of HIV surveillance methods in high-risk groups, as well as methods used to carry out studies that aim to evaluate HIV prevention interventions in high-risk groups.

The first part of the course gives an overview of the components of a comprehensive HIV surveillance in high-risk groups, such as pre-surveillance assessment, mapping, and surveys that are implemented as part of the community-based surveillance. Study designs that will be described include cluster-based stratified sampling, time-location sampling and respondent-driven sampling. Advanced methods in HIV surveillance will be also outlined, such as HIV incidence-based surveillance and data triangulation as a programme evaluation tool.

In the second part of the course participants are provided with practical guidance on how to use different study designs to evaluate HIV interventions that are implemented in their countries among key populations at higher risk.

The most important part of the course is the protocol development exercise. Participants can choose to develop two types of protocols: (I) a protocol for an HIV surveillance survey in high-risk groups; or (II) a protocol for a study that evaluate HIV intervention(s) in high-risk groups using simple (cross-sectional surveys, programmatic data) or more complex designs (cohort studies, randomised control trials, data triangulation). Participants are encouraged to work on protocols that might be later on used in their own countries.

Key topics of the course are:

    •Components of HIV surveillance in high-risk groups
    •Non-probabilistic and probabilistic sample designs in community-based surveys in high-risk groups
    •Overview of HIV prevention interventions in high-risk groups
    •Methods for evaluation of preventions using simple and more complex designs

For more information

List of trainings

•M1 Introduction to HIV/AIDS Surveillance (RU)
•M2 Behavioral surveillance (RU)
•M3 Surveillance of Sexually Transmitted Infections (RU)
•M4 Biological HIV Surveillance (RU)
•M5 HIV Surveillance in Most at-risk Populations (RU)
•M6 HIV/AIDS Surveillance among Tuberculosis Patients (RU)
•M7 Monitoring and Evaluation of National HIV/AIDS Response (RU)
•M8 Respondent-Driven Sampling
•M9 Analysis and Interpretation of Data from Respondent-Driven Sampling using RDSAT
•M10 Time – Location Sampling
•M11 Data Triangulation (RU)
•M12 Designing Protocols for Population-Based and Clinic-Based HIV Surveillance Surveys
•M13 Surveillance for HIV programme managers (RU)
•M14 Surveillance in low and concentrated epidemics
•M15 HIV Drug Resistance Prevention and Assessment
•M16 Data use and report writing in HIV surveillance
•M17 Strategic Planning and Management of the Knowledge Hubs (RU)
•M18 Advanced Methods in HIV Surveillance
•M19 Writing up results of research and surveillance studies
•M20 Evaluation of HIV Surveillance Systems, and Data Use and Reporting
•M21 Programme evaluation in key populations at high risk of HIV
•M22 Facility-Based HIV Surveillance
•M23 Population Size Estimates

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IDRC-Cornell Workshop

Labor Standards Enforcement

Date: 10-11 September, 2011

Venue: Cornell University, Room 32, Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY

Sunday, September 11

9.00-10.15 Session VI

Douglas Heckathorn, Cornell Paper Title: “Quantifying Wage Violations among Lower Tier Workers in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles: A Respondent-Driven Sampling Approach”

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Training course in sampling methods and analysis for surveys among populations at increased risk of HIV

Date: 20 – 24 November 2011

Venue:Tehran, Iran

Introduction

Populations at increased risk of HIV are often hidden and hard-to-reach groups. In most countries they include sex-workers (SWs), men who have sex with men (MSM) and injecting drug users (IDUs). These groups have been considered at increased risk in nearly all countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region of WHO.

Experts, who have been involved in biological and behavioral HIV surveillance among these groups, know how difficult it is to select a representative sample using classic sampling methods. Several alternative sampling methods have been designed to overcome this problem as much as possible. Time Location Sampling (TLS) and Respondent- Driven Sampling (RDS) have increasingly been used in the Region. .

In this short course, we will introduce and review the most common sampling methods for surveys among populations at increased risk of HIV and also the main steps of the analysis of the data collected. Our aim is to enable participants to choose and apply the most appropriate sampling and analysis methods for future surveys among these populations in their countries.

Learning objectives

Participants will have acquired the following knowledge and skills

    Knowledge of pros and cons of classic sampling methods in HIV surveillance among populations at increased risk of HIV and other Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs)
    Knowledge of new sampling techniques, TLS and RDS as methods for selection of more representative samples from these populations
    Ability to choose the most appropriate sampling method according to the respective country context and population to be studied
    Skills in data analysis of RDS by using RDSAT software
    Ability to critically appraise every sampling method which has been applied for populations at increased risk of HIV
    Skills in interpreting the findings of a survey.

More information contact.

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Internet Survey Methodology Workshop 2011

Date:29 – 31 August 2011

Venue: The Hague

Hosted by Statistics Netherlands, organized in collaboration with Utrecht University

The Internet Survey Methodology Workshops bring together researchers involved in methodological research of all aspects of Internet surveys. This includes Internet data collection for official statistics, academic research amd market research.

The number of participants is restricted. Participants present their paper orally. The presentation is followed by a discussion.

For more information

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Workshop on Respondent Driven Sampling

Date:16-17 June, 2011,

Venue: Institute of Education, London

The purpose of this conference is to bring together statisticians and survey methodologists developing Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) with researchers using the method to survey immigrants. RDS utilizes social networks to find, survey, and develop inference on “hidden populations” like sex workers, drug users, and migrant workers. The method was introduced in 1997 and has since become widely used, yet RDS is often incorrectly implemented and the most recent statistical developments can take years to come into practice. Bringing together researchers using RDS methodology with leading statisticians and survey methodologists will further the aims of all three, by informing theory with practice and practice with the latest developments in statistical and methodological theory. The conference will also inform future applications of the method on migrant populations.

An international group of invited speakers include:
•Douglas Heckathorn
•Simon Frost
•Krista Gile
•Matthew Salganik
•Richard White
•Peter Muhlau
•Lisa Johnston
•Andrew Cleary
•Tetiana Saliuk
•Guri Tyldum
•Renee Luthra

More information

To submit your training or workshop send to:

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