Burden of HIV and sexual behaviour among men who have sex with men and male sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya

MOPE301 – Poster Exhibition

Burden of HIV and sexual behaviour among men who have sex with men and male sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya

N. Muraguri1, W. Tun2, J. Okal3, D. Broz4, H.F. Raymond5, T. Kellogg5, S. Dadabhai6, H. Musyoki1, M. Sheehy7, D. Kuria8, R. Kaiser9, S. Geibel3

1National AIDS and STI Control Programme, Nairobi, Kenya, 2Population Council, Washington, United States, 3Population Council, Nairobi, Kenya, 4Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Global HIV/AIDS, Atlanta, United States, 5San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, United States, 6University of California, San Francisco, Nairobi, Kenya, 7Population Council, New York, United States, 8Gay and Lesbian Coalition of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya, 9Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Global HIV/AIDS, Nairobi, Kenya

 

Background: Men who have sex with men (MSM) in Africa are more vulnerable to HIV infection than corresponding general populations. Previous HIV prevalence surveys among African MSM, however, have not prominently highlighted differences between sex workers and non-sex workers within sampled MSM populations.

 

Methods: We recruited 563 MSM using respondent-driven sampling, tested for HIV and conducted a behavioral interview. Results were stratified by MSM who sold sex and MSM who did not sell sex, using the respondent-driven sampling analysis tool (RDSAT).

 

Results: Of the 563 participants, 273 (48.5.5% crude, 39.6% RDS-adjusted) reported sex work as their main occupation, or selling sex to men in the past two months. MSM non-sex workers and male sex workers (MSW) were similar in age and marital status, but MSW were less likely to have attended college. MSW were significantly more likely to have been assaulted physically (15.1% vs. 0.8%), verbally or (57.7% vs. 23.1%) or sexually (10% vs. 2.5%), and to have been refused services in the past year (66.7% vs. 32.8%). MSW were significantly more likely to have had receptive anal sex with 3 or more male partners (65.7% vs. 18.0%) and unprotected receptive anal intercourse (40.0% vs. 22.8%). MSW were significantly more likely to be HIV infected (26%, 95% CI:17.8-35.6) than other MSM (12.2%, 95% CI:7.6-17.5).

 

Conclusions: MSW had higher HIV prevalence and reported more risky behaviors and social vulnerabilities than MSM who did not sell sex. However, HIV prevalence among non-sex worker MSM was still higher than the general population of men in Nairobi (3.4%, 2008-09 DHS). HIV programs should scale up comprehensive HIV programs to address risky sexual behavior, access to treatment, and structural interventions. HIV interventions should address MSM in general, but prioritize male sex workers as a group that requires urgent attention.

Disclaimer: The content and views in this abstract are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the affiliated organizations, the Centers for Disease Control, United States Government, or Government of Kenya.

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Posted on July 23, 2012, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Comments Off on Burden of HIV and sexual behaviour among men who have sex with men and male sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya.

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